Which Freedoms Are Most Important?

Posted on December 12, 2012 1:00 pm

A Rasmussen survey had people rank their freedoms, with freedom of speech being more important and right to bear arms least important. Best of the Web characterized this to asking Moms to rank their children. Our freedoms are our God-given rights; it’s a package deal. You recognize all of them or they all get compromised.

But, as a practical matter, the right to bear arms is the most important. Because when you have a gun in hand, people much more readily recognize your other rights. How often do you hear, “Hey, you with the gun, shut up.”?

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9 Responses to “Which Freedoms Are Most Important?”

  1. Jimmy says:

    or…

    “Hey, you with the gun, give me your money.”

    But at one time, something like this was heard:

    “Hey, you with the gun, come fight the American Revolution.”

  2. Mythilt says:

    Nope, the most important right is the right to own property. All other rights in some way derive or depend on the right of property ownership. The right to bear arms is because you must be able to defend your property, freedom of speech is because you must be able to own your words to give them meaning. Our fore-fathers knew this, but alas thought it self-evident, which is why in the Declaration of Independence, they changed ‘Life, Liberty, and Property’ to ‘Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”, because property ownership’s importance was obvious.

  3. Rast says:

    Mythilt, there’s no “right to own property” in the Bill of Rights, just like there isn’t a right to a job or health care. Of course you have a right to keep whatever you’ve created, bought, or been given, and use your guns to defend it if need be, but that’s not why the right to bear arms was enshrined in the Constitution.

    “freedom of speech is because you must be able to own your words to give them meaning”. This sounds like pretentious bullshit; have you been in college recently? (No offense.) Regardless, it’s wrong.

  4. Son of Bob says:

    “How often do you hear, ‘Hey, you with the gun, shut up.’?”

    I only hear that at rap music awards programs. It usually involves Kanye West.

  5. arik says:

    The right to bear arms is the most important. With that right we have the means to secure all the others.

  6. ClintK says:

    Freedom of religion, first and foremost. The liberty to attempt to work out the reasoning behind one’s existence is from what all other freedoms extend. This is why it is the first clause of the First Amendment.

  7. Brian Major says:

    After clicking through the link and looking at the question wording, I want to know the results to the second question:

    “Is the federal government today a protector of individuals rights or a threat to individual rights?”

  8. Mythilt says:

    Actually, Rast, the Right to own property in the Bill of Rights, it is part of Amendment 5.

    No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

    It doesn’t just protect you against self-incrimination.

    As for my statement about right to own words and freedom of speech, I guess you feel that it is perfectly alright for me to claim that you said ‘Michelle Obama is a MILF’. Libel does not exist if you do not own what you say.

    I will admit that I misremembered one thing, it was Locke who wrote of the inalienable right of property, being ‘Life, Liberty, and Estate’. It is felt that Jefferson channeled Locke, but changed the wording to pursuit of happiness.

  9. Rast says:

    Mythilt, that’s nice and all, but the 1st and 2nd amendments aren’t based on a right to property.

    The Founders had just won a war against the previous government, and they wanted to protect the rights to speak and write and bear arms against the government. It’s that simple.

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