You Haven’t Heard “Molon Labe” Until You’ve Heard It Sung in the Original Texan

Posted on February 9, 2013 10:00 pm


[YouTube direct link] (Viewer #18,247)

Having gone to a public school, I was never told about the Battle of Gonzales.

It’s a quintessentially American tale, and good reading.

Send to Kindle
1 Star (Hated it)2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (Awesome) (7 votes, average: 4.43 out of 5)

7 Responses to “You Haven’t Heard “Molon Labe” Until You’ve Heard It Sung in the Original Texan”

  1. badmartin says:

    I personally plan to keep well away from this “Molon Labe” thing. A good slogan can be a real asset to a cause but this one ain’t the ticket. Tell me if this scenario sounds farfetched:

    Liberal news talk show moves to a new topic showing this clip from a montage of informal interviews at RKBA rally:

    Reporter:Good afternoon sir, a few questions? (nods approval) I see you have a slogan on your sign, can you tell me about it?
    Participant:Sure, its Molon Labe, it means come and take it.

    Reporter:I haven’t heard it before, where does it come from?
    Participant: It’s from 300, it’s latin.

    Reporter:300? you mean the movie about Leonidas at Thermopylae?
    Participant:Yep. The Persians said lay down your arms and the Spartans said come and take them. They were fighting for their freedom. They kept their freedom because they were willing to fight for it.

    Reporter:Can you tell me what each of the words mean? For example what does Molon mean?
    Participant:I don’t know the actual words but the expression means come and take it.

    Reporter:Thank you.
    Participant:No problem.

    Back at studio:
    Commentator 1: You see? This is emblematic of the pro-gun movement. The expression isn’t Latin, but Greek. And the practice of using classical epigrams to make political admonitions is seriously outdated and gives the impression of a not-particularly-well-informed individual hoping to be taken seriously as an actual political professional.

    Commentator 2: Right. And that word Molon is just a little too close to Moron isn’t it?

    (all commentators share a laugh)

    Commentator 3: You know, if these people would spend just a little more time in the classroom they might not feel this need to overcompensate for their feelings of social inadequacy by carrying these deadly guns around everywhere and contributing to the violence we see in places like Colorado and Connecticut.

  2. Harvey says:

    @1 – Granted, that’s probably how it will go, but there’s NOTHING you can say that the liberal media won’t twist to make it appear in the worst possible light.

    Say what you mean, believe what you say, and be willing to defend or clarify what you’ve said. No man can be expected to do more.

  3. FredKey says:

    I was just working on a book about the Alamo, and it covered some background, including the battle in Gonzales. I thought it was AWESOME. If Texas wants to give it a go as an independent country again, I may have to emigrate.

  4. blarg says:

    I think “cold dead hand” is a better and more effective slogan. It’s also in English.

  5. Corsair says:

    Get your free bumper sticker from our local radio station. http://ksevradio.com/featured/come-and-take-it

  6. CTCompromise says:

    How about: “I believe The Bill of Rights is collective. Give Up One, You Will Give Up All”
    Of course, it can then be shortened to “Give Up One, You Will Give Up All”.

  7. cb says:

    cold dead hands has a lot of power and meaning especially when yelled by someone like Hesston while shaking a rifle over his head

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>